Detail View: LUNA: Folger Manuscript Transcriptions Collection: A book of verses collected by me, R. Dungarvan [manuscript].

Digital Image File Name: 
142175
Source Call Number: 
V.a.125
Source Title: 
A book of verses collected by me, R. Dungarvan [manuscript].
Image Details: 
Part I. When reading Part I, Part II is inverted and reversed.
Source Creator: 
Burlington, Richard Boyle, Earl of, 1612-1698, compiler.
Source Created or Published: 
ca. 1630
Physical Description: 
folio 22 verso || folio 23 recto
Digital Image Type: 
FSL collection
Hamnet Catalog Link: 
http://hamnet.folger.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=229445
Transcription: 
By M r D r Corbet . I reade of Ilands floating & remouede, In Ouid s time but neuer saw it prou'd Till now; That fable by the Prince & you By your transposing England is made trew. Wee are not where wee were the Dogstar ranges Noe cooler in our climate in Spaine s. The selfesame breath, same ayre, same heate & burning, Is here as there will bee till your returning. Come ere the Carde bee alter'd least perhaps Your stay doe make an errour in our maps. Least England will bee found when you shall pass A thousand miles more Southard then it was. O that you were (my lord) o that you were Now in Blackfryers , or had a disguis'd eare O that you were Smith againe two howers to see In Pauls next Sunday at full Sea at three Then should you hear the Legent of each day The perills of your Inn & of your way. Your entertainements, accidents, vntill You could arriue at court & reach Madrill Then should you hear how the state Graunds did floate With their twice double diligence aboute you. How our enuiron'd Prince Walk't with a guard Of Spanish Spies & his owne seruants bar'd How not a Chaplaine of his owne may stay When hee would hear a Sermon preach't or pray. page break 23 You would bee hungrie hauing dynde to hear The price of victuals & the skarstie there As if the Prince had ventur'd there his life To make a famine not to fetch a wife Yours eggs (which must be added to) are there As English capons Capons as sheepe here. Noe grasse for horse, or cattell, for they say It is not cut & made, grasse there growes hay. Item your pullets are distinguisht there Into foure quarters as wee carue the yeare. And are a weeke a roasting, Monday noone A winge, at supper something with a spoone. Tuseday a legg & soe forth, sunday more The liuer & the gizard beetwint fowre. As for your Mutton in the best househoulder Tis fellonie to cheapen a hole shoulder Then tis we seething hot with you they sweare You neuer hearde of a raw Oyster there. Your could meat coms in reaking, & your wine Is all burnt Sack the fier is in the wine. Lord how our Stomacks come to vs againe When wee conceiue what Snatching is in Spaine . I whilst I write & doe the newes repeate, Am forc't to call for breake fast in & eat. But harke you noble S i r in one crosse weeke My lord hath lost 4000 L: at Gleeke And though they doe allow you little meat They are content your losses should be great False on my Deanerie falser then your fare is Or then your difference with the lady d'Oliueres . Which
Credit: 
Transcriptions made by Shakespeare's World volunteers (shakespearesworld.org), participants in EMROC classes and transcribathons (emroc.hypotheses.org), participants in Folger paleography classes and transcribathons, and Folger docents.