Detail View: LUNA: Folger Manuscript Transcriptions Collection: Receipt book [manuscript].

Digital Image File Name: 
123224
Source Call Number: 
V.a.140
Source Title: 
Receipt book [manuscript].
Source Created or Published: 
compiled ca. 1600
Physical Description: 
folio 35 verso || folio 36 recto
Digital Image Type: 
FSL collection
Hamnet Catalog Link: 
http://hamnet.folger.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=231384
Transcription: 
4 folio 36 recto 36 the lungs are soe cooped vpp, that they have not roome enough freely to moove in. Now the motion of the brest, depends vppon the animall facultye, which being of a subtill spirituous essence; cannot properly be sayd in it selfe to suffer hurt, yet by phisitians, it is sayd to be hurt, or depraved in it selfe when through weakeness of great evacuations, or sickness, it doth not soe amply conduce vnto the benefitt of motion, as it should and allsoe, when it descends not precisely vppon the muscles of the brest and midriff, which happens, for that the brayne (the origenall of the animall virtue) doth not according to the necesitye of nature, communicate it vnto those parts, by reason of some great disease in the head as apoplexye, and such like or through some imperfection of the nerves (proceeding from the braynes) whose office it is to convaighe this animall spiritt or facultye, vnto the muscles of the brest, and midriff. Moreover, the facultye of the brest is sayd to be hindered by accident, when as the same faculty (by the due assistance of the animall spirits) is in perfect force, and yet cannot execute its necessarye function, being hindered from extending, or stretching the brest to the full scope of natures ^bounds appointed, by reason of paynes in the neck, sides, midriff, belly, and bowels, or by any bruse, hurt or inflammation in any of these, and by the obstruction, or swelling of the liver, or spleen, as allsoe, by reason of water, phleame, or blood impacting the concave part of the brest, and soe straightening it, and likewise allsoe by vapors, and wind abounding in the paunch, and rising vnto the midriff, which not only oppress motion, and soe cause difficulty of breathing, but many times soe puffe vpp those parts and soe incroach further, that there is danger of suffocation. According to Hypocrates, Galen, Avicex, Celsus, and others of later ages, as Fernelius Horstius, and Senertus, it is concluded that the origenall 5
Credit: 
Transcriptions made by Shakespeare’s World volunteers (shakespearesworld.org), participants in EMROC classes and transcribathons (emroc.hypotheses.org), participants in Folger paleography classes and transcribathons, and Folger docents.