Detail View: LUNA: Folger Manuscript Transcriptions Collection: Receipt book [manuscript].

Digital Image File Name: 
124264
Source Call Number: 
V.b.363
Source Title: 
Receipt book [manuscript].
Source Created or Published: 
ca. 1679-1694
Physical Description: 
page 31 || page 32
Digital Image Type: 
FSL collection
Hamnet Catalog Link: 
http://hamnet.folger.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=244650
Transcription: 
31 For pain in the Stomach A Plaister Malant Venice treacle, saffron powdered, powder of Nutmegs, powder of Cloves, oyl of Mace mixt all together to a past like salve then spread upon lether the bigness of ones hand, and over it the powder of Nutmeg searct thick and over all a piece of Sarsnet and applyed to the pitt of the stomach. is excellent Another Treacle mixt with powder of roasted Nutmegs and made into Pills, and take three of them in a morning, & some white-wine wine Mulld with the powder of roasted Nutmegs drank after it, and the same Mulld wine taken (a little at a time) at any time of the day, as often as yow will. The virtues of Doctor Thorotons Balsom - of Nottingham It is most Excelent to be taken by women in Labour, and chiefly against after pains. alsoe for faintings, weakness, or Squeamishness of the Stomach, being taken in the morning, Excellent for a Bloody Flux, or A Consumption, alsoe for the stone, or pain in the Back, and to help digestion, or wind in the stomach, or Cold, for the spleen, and chollick. some solutive simples being added, it purgeth safely. Ialop, Rosin, Scammony. halfe a dram and 3. grains is the purging dose, but the other the quantity of a hassle Nutt, but you may take of it (i.e. the Balsom to the quantity of an ounce Falling Sickness. The fresh root of the single-Male-Pionie being hung about a childs neck and worn constantly preserveth him from the fitts. in an older persons if the desease be not too prevalent, steep the Roots in sack 24. hours & drink a good draught first and last many days together before & after the full Moon; and before hand use to drink posset drink made with Betony (The black seeds taken before Bed-time in a little sack is very good for Mellancholly dreams) the Male-Bettony is best but scarce. To stay a Flux The inner Skin that covers the white Chesnutt is Extreamly Astringent; & the powder or decoction, presently stays a flux. the meal of chesnutts mixt with honey into an Electuary, is very good for a Cough and spitting of Blood. Green Wounds The water found in the Bladders on the leavs of Elms while fresh is very effectuall to cleanse the Skin and make it fair. The said water put into a glass (and sett in the ground or in Dung for 25 days) the mouth thereof being close stopt, and the bottom being sett upon a lay of ordinary salt, that the feces may settle & the water become very clear, is so singular & Soveraigne a balm for green wounds, that it is admirable to see how quickly they will be healed thereby being used with soft Tents. Bald= heads The Roots of the Elm boyld in water a great while, and the fatt rising Skimmd off is a most excellent oyntment quickly to restore hair to Bald-heads. page 32 32 Bad Aires & infection: Mithridates King of Pontus. Two dried wallnutts or hassle nutts two good figgs 20. leavs of Rew 2. or 3. corns of Salt beaten together is an Excellent Antidote eaten every morning fasting. A powder for Worms or Grubs small or great in Men or children Take of wormseed, fennigreek, Aloes Cicatrine, Coraline or Sea Moss Saint Johns Wort hartshorn horn prepared & burnt, of each 3 drams, make all into fine powder, add to it one dram and halfe of the flowre of brimstone, and three times the weight of all these in Loaf sugar finely beaten, mix all well, to a Man give one dram and a halfe in a little Muscadine or sweet wort, before the hopps be putt in, being infused overnight and drink warm in the morning & fast 2 hours. three mornings together at the full and change, to a child, a dram, or halfe a dram, in the pap of Apple or stewed prunes. Spirit of Eldar Flowers. Infuse so many Eldar Flowers in a Gallon of Sack so as it may but just cover them, close stopt for 2 days, then still it in Baineo or a cold Still well lated, then still it very cool and slow. Spirit of Balm. Take a gallon of the best Brandy, steep in it as much Balme (bruised) as it will cover, (in a large wide mouth'd glass close stopt) ) for a week then still it in a Cold Still, Laying a good thick layer of fresh Balme (a little bruised) in the bottome of the Still, and as much on the top (the brandy infusion being in the middle) so being well lated still it cool till it has dropt all. To Kill a Corn, rub it over with the milk of Spurge, nothing is better. For A Cold. Take halfe a pint of Brandy, two ounces of Sugar candy ] burn it as long as it will flame, putting in all the while as it burns some white Sugar candy beaten fine by spoonfulls untill the aforesaid said two ounces be put in, then take it off and put in two spoonfulls of Syrup of Clove gilliflowers, & take it hott in Bed To make Ink Mr Bower's way Take a quart of rain water (or vinigar which is better for colour) boil it and skimm it clear, and put to it (if you boil vinigar) one quart of hott boild rain water, four ounces of Galls bruised, let it stand three days often stirring it then put to it four ounces of green Copperice, let it stand 3 days more with fre= =quent stirring it, then put in four ounces of White Gumm Arabick & often stir it, if it be sommer set it in the Sun to thicken, but always stop it close for the Air coming to it makes it hoar or mouldy; Galls make Ink Red, Copprice makes it blew, when it has stood some time, pour of the Ink gently from the sudds & grounds and keep it for use, and put a quart of Rain Water to those dreggs and grounds it will soon be tollerable good Ink with stirring Hot Burn or scald Exelent good Hoggs grease fryed and rendered up in Cakes, mixt with an Equall quantity of Iuicy hard Apples pared & cored & beaten in a stone Morter to A Pulp is excelent for burn or scald
Credit: 
Transcriptions made by Shakespeare’s World volunteers (shakespearesworld.org), participants in EMROC classes and transcribathons (emroc.hypotheses.org), participants in Folger paleography classes and transcribathons, and Folger docents.