Detail View: LUNA: Folger Manuscript Transcriptions Collection: Miscellany [manuscript].

Digital Image File Name: 
126991
Source Call Number: 
V.a.260
Source Title: 
Miscellany [manuscript].
Image Details: 
Part II. When reading Part II, Part I is inverted and reversed.
Source Created or Published: 
ca. 1613-ca. 1756
Physical Description: 
folio 58 verso || folio 59 recto
Digital Image Type: 
FSL collection
Hamnet Catalog Link: 
http://hamnet.folger.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=231287
Transcription: 
To change Red Hair to a beautifull Brown. Take black-lead & Black Ebony- =shavings one ounce of each, let these boyl an hour in a Pint of clear water, when fine bottle it for use; wet a comb in the Liquid, & comb your Hair often with it; To make the Hair black add 2 Drachms of Camphire to the Ingredients. This is the Liquid for changing= Hair advertised at half a guinea a Bottle. A never failing secret for curing the Tooth-Ach. Put a Piece of salt Peter to the aching Tooth, Teeth, or Gums, about the size of a Horse-Bean, & in a few mintes you will certainly find relief folio 59 recto 59. To make the valuable Fire-Ball To a Ton of soft mellow clay, that will work well, & is free from stones, sift 3 or 4 ^or so Bushells of small sea Cole, & this to be well mixt with the Clay, in the manner the = Labourer works his mortar, then make it in such sized Lumps as will best fit your Grate, perhaps 3 or 4 Inches square; when made up in Lumps it will be proper to lay them in a shed, or Barn, or out House to dry for use; for they burn then much better than when newly made & wett; but in case you are obliged to use them immediately, it is proper to lay a few of those Balls either behing the Fire, or near it, where they get dry very soon; where your fire burns clear place some of those Balls in the Front of your Fire, as you do large coals but observe, those Balls are not to be put on till your Fire burns
Credit: 
Transcriptions made by Shakespeare’s World volunteers (shakespearesworld.org), participants in EMROC classes and transcribathons (emroc.hypotheses.org), participants in Folger paleography classes and transcribathons, and Folger docents.