REFINE 

Browse All : A treatise of algebra, both historical and practical. Shewing, the original, progress, and advancement thereof, from time to time; and by what steps it hath attained to the heighth at which now it is. With some additional treatises, I. Of the cono-cuneus; being a body representing in part a conus, in part a cuneus. II. Of angular sections; and other things relating there-unto, and to trigonometry. III. Of the angle of contact; with other things appertaining to the composition of magnitudes, the inceptives of magnitudes, and the composition of motions, with the results thereof. IV. Of combinations, alternations, and aliquot parts. By John Wallis, D.D. Professor of geometry in the University of Oxford; and a member of the Royal Society, London.

1-1 of 1
A treatise of algebra, both historical and practical. Shewing, the original, progress, and advancement thereof, from time to time; and by what steps it hath attained to the heighth at which now it is. With some additional treatises, I. Of the cono-cuneus; being a body representing in part a conus, in part a cuneus. II. Of angular sections; and other things relating there-unto, and to trigonometry. III. Of the angle of contact; with other things appertaining to the composition of magnitudes, the inceptives of magnitudes, and the composition of motions, with the results thereof. IV. Of combinations, alternations, and aliquot parts. By John Wallis, D.D. Professor of geometry in the University of Oxford; and a member of the Royal Society, London.
A treatise of algebra, ...
[1685]
W613 copy 1
frontispiece: portrait ...
 
Source Creator
Wallis, John, 1616-1703.
Source Title
A treatise of algebra, both historical and practical. Shewing, the original, progress, and advancement thereof, from time to time; and by what steps it hath attained to the heighth at which now it is. With some additional treatises, I. Of the cono-cuneus; being a body representing in part a conus, in part a cuneus. II. Of angular sections; and other things relating there-unto, and to trigonometry. III. Of the angle of contact; with other things appertaining to the composition of magnitudes, the inceptives of magnitudes, and the composition of motions, with the results thereof. IV. Of combinations, alternations, and aliquot parts. By John Wallis, D.D. Professor of geometry in the University of Oxford; and a member of the Royal Society, London.
Source Created or Published
[1685]
Source Call Number
W613 copy 1
1-1 of 1